journal de bord

08/02/2008

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Land on the radar

Land on the radar

At 5 pm, Charles Terrin announced « Land on the radar ». An hour later, the first lights appeared in the dark. The Norwegian coast was facing us.

After four days of uninterrupted navigation with an average speed of 7 knots with sea birds as our only companions, Tara had covered 540 miles since Longyearbyen. We noticed our first boat since Monday, a Russian bulk carrier cargo.
It was 9 pm onboard Tara, part of the crew was resting before the following watch. A well deserved rest because the night before was very rough. Peaks up to 50 knots were recorded by the onboard anemometer. For those who were resting in their cabins, it was very difficult to sleep.

This Norwegian coastal navigation will enable the crew to pep up sheltered in the islands of Vesteralen and Lofoten. These are located at the same latitude as Narvik. The captain will have to hold on all this night because navigation within these islands, in this maze of fjords is not easy.

This Norway stage, with no call planned, will enable us to survive a new depression of 50 knots forecast for this evening under the wind of these islands. One cannot say that the Sea of Norway is a sea of tranquillity. According to plan, once we have weathered this storm, we shall head towards Porthsmouth in the UK. We have fifteen days before our projected arrival in Lorient. We have covered a third of the global distance that is roughly 1 500 miles.
This evening, the sea night has been replaced by coastal lights, The swell has disappeared, Tara is no longer reeling or listing. An aurora borealis seems to salute our arrival in Norway which adds to our general feeling of appeasement.

Vincent Hilaire

Tara 2006-2007

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