journal de bord

08/11/2007

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South East course against the wind

South East course against the wind

After moving a little at the beginning of this week, things have calmed down on the pack ice. Following these pressures, the boat’s trim has slightly come back to balance and the boat has lost a bit of its list on her port side by lifting herself up at the back by a few centimetres.

The wind is still blowing from the East between 15 and 20 knots. The sky has cleared and we can see the stars once again. We were even surprised to see this morning a few blue and orange glimmers in the horizon. It is difficult for some of us to feel completely in the polar night.
After the storm, our field of vision has widened. This has enabled us to discover a changed landscape at the fore of the boat. The lead that we saw at the beginning of the week has closed in and this has triggered new pressure ridges, 2 meters high, sparing Tara for the moment.
It is easier in these conditions (wind of 15-20 knots) to resume our outdoors daily activities like going to break ice and gather snow to supply the boat with water. But we must be careful during our trips to the ice for the scientific activities and also during ocean measurements. The pack ice often awakens 12 to 24 hours after a storm. Moreover, during the night, we changed our course; we are heading now toward the South East against the wind with the risk of fractures.
For the polar winter newcomers, we are discovering new magical and unstable surroundings, the pack ice animated by the natural forces of wind and currents. It is fascinating!

Marion Lauters

Tara 2006-2007

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14/07/2009

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14/07/2009

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